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Hack Your Brain – Make Video Podcast

( via makezine )


This weekend, learn how to hack your brain by making Mitch Altman’s Brain Machine! It flashes LEDs into your eyes and beeps sounds into your ears to make your brain waves sync up into beta, alpha, theta, and delta brainwaves!

Mitch invents cool things that make the world a better place. He’s well known for the TV-B-GONE and this brain machine is his latest project. One of the cool things about this project, is that it builds on an open source project. Mitch used Lady Ada‘s open source MiniPOV and switched out LEDs and added new capacitors and resistors and then rewrote the firmware to make it into the brain machine. It’s super cool when people make hardware open source so that others can work with it!

513591733 E18C33A406

Make sure to take pictures of your build and of you in your brain machine and upload them to the Make: flickr pool.

Weekend Projects is sponsored by microchip.com. Check out their seminars and 16 bit contest.

Get the podcast and pdf downloaded automatically in itunes. – Link

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Filed under: design, DIY, hack, space/place, technology

Mapping Festival 2007 documentary on Swiss TV

( via mapping festival blog )

Let’s go straight to the hype! Interviews with a select group of the participants and the festival organizers. Overall it does a pretty good job of covering what this stuff is all about. If I can I’ll make a version with subtitles.

Filed under: art, festival, hack, music, new media, social, space/place, technology

Architecture and interaction design, via adaptation and hackability, Posted by Dan Hill at City of Sound (reblog)

( via remix theory )

Image and text source: City of Sound

May 23, 2006

Dan Saffer recently asked me to contribute some thoughts on adaptation, hackability and architecture to his forthcoming book Designing for Interaction (New Riders, 2006), alongside 10 other ‘interviewees’ such as Marc Rettig, Larry Tesler, Hugh Dubberly, Brenda Laurel etc. Dan’s been posting their various responses up at the official book site (see also UXMatters) yet he kindly agreed to let me post my full answers below (the book will feature an excerpt).

The questions he posed were: Can products be made hackable, or are all products hackable? What types of things can be designed into products to make them more hackable? What are the qualities of adaptive designs? You’ve spoken on putting “creative power in the hands of non-designers.” How do interaction designers go about doing that? What can interaction designers learn about adaptability from architecture?

Given this, Dan had inadvertently provided me with the impetus to get down a decent summary to a few years’ worth of thinking around this subject. So what follows directly addresses one of the stated purposes behind this blog: to see what we can draw from the culture and practice of architecture and design into this new arena of interaction design – and some of the issues in doing so. (An unstated purpose of the blog – of providing me with an indexed notebook – is also fulfilled!) Here goes:

Can products be made hackable, or are all products hackable?

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Filed under: architecture, art, design, hack, new media, opensource, research, space/place, technology

Selfish Joystick

( via wmna )

nOtbOt, by Walter Langelaar, is a self-playing videogame. Viewers who try to get hold of the controller can only be disappointed as the interface is controlled and deranged only by the reactions to its own virtual environment in a kind of loop where the bot is driven by the joystick and the joystick responds to the bot.

0ajoystti7.jpg 0ajoystti8.jpg

An old Logitech force-feedback joystick was modified so that it is used as input data to control a ‘first-person’ videogame. The view-angle data generated by the virtual player is sent to a PD app, which in turn loops the incoming data back into the force-feedback system of the joystick. The robotic maneuvers are projected in real-time in front of it.

Human interaction with the game/controller becomes obsolete, resulting in a completely erratic form of [art]ificial intelligence.

Video.

The work is part of the Gameworld exhibition at Laboral, Gijon, Spain. Runs until June 30.
Via Yves Bernard.

Filed under: art, hack, locative, new media, physical computing, space/place, technology

Chest made from circuit boards by Theo Kamecke

( via cribcandy )

Theo Kamecke 

Filed under: art, design, hack

Micro-chic

( via dataisnature )

Diagramming Microchips
Eprom Intel Corp 1974 & AT&T Bell microprocessor (Crisp) from Diagramming Microchips by Cara McCarthy

The out of print ‘Diagramming Microchips’ by Cara McCarthy is an exquisite surrender! – High quality full page spreads of orthogonal microchip arcologies and micro-labyrinthine PCB boogie woogies! Taking the liberty with my camera at Pete’s place, I snatched these pictures for you.

The mandalic attitude of this neural net chip with its conspiratorial eye in the triangle, IBMs OP-art (Dram)mifiactions. And the Universal Turin’ posturing of this Intel EPROM.

There used to be guy in the old Spitalfields market who fashioned some nice lamps from legacy printed circuit boards but Theo Kamecke wears the crown in this territory. Harnessing the hieroglyphic nature of these boards he makes intricate work that implies craftsmanship of artwork made millenniums ago.

Theo Kamecke
Anasazi & Norse (details) – Theo Kamecke

‘He saw in the graphic patterns of electronic circuitry with their endless variety the same beauty we perceive in seashells, in crystals, in the grain of wood or even in the tree itself. All these are, after all, forms derived from function, so if we find beauty in them it is not because they were designed to please the eye.’

Other artists, mentioned at NatureisData before, employing the circuit board aesthetic are Mark Wilson, particularly his paintings and drawings, & Jock Coopers fractal circuitscape elevations, perhaps conjectural plans for a future city. Polyforms and Conduits featured Peter Halley’s cell network paintings, the same post also pointed to Brianelectro’s glitchboards.

microchique
Nobili-Pesavento 29-state machine & untitled, 1973 drawing, Mark Wilson

We should not forget our old friends the Cellular Automata, which compare well visually with IBM’s Dram chip, both contain labyrinthine steps on a set of electronic ghats connecting a traffic system for the ebb and flow electrical resistance. A while back the Crystalpunk high priest posted a wonderful picture, part circuit, part Automata, part architecture over datastream – the ultimate in microchique!

Filed under: art, design, hack, new media, technology

The Three Basic Forms of Remix: a Point of Entry, by Eduardo Navas

Originated at Remix Theory by Eduado Navas

Image source: Turbulence.org
Layout by Ludmil Trenkov
Duchamp source: Art History Birmington
Levine source: Artnet

(This text has been recently added to the section titled Remix Defined to expand my general definition of Remix.)

The following summary is a copy and paste collage (a type of literary remix) of my lectures and preliminary writings since 2005. My definition of Remix was first introduced in one of my most recent texts: Turbulence: Remixes + Bonus Beats, commissioned by Turbulence.org. Many of the ideas I entertain in the text for Turbulence were first discussed in various presentations during the Summer of 2006. (See the list of places here plus an earlier version of my definition of Remix). Below, the section titled “remixes” takes parts from the section by the same name in the Turbulence text, and the section titled “remix defined” consists of excerpts of my definitions which have been revised for an upcoming text soon to be released in English and Spanish by Telefonica in Buenos Aires, Argentina. The full text will be released online once it is officially published.

REMIX DEFINED

To understand Remix as a cultural phenomenon, we must first define it in music. A music remix, in general, is a reinterpretation of a pre-existing song, meaning that the “aura” of the original will be dominant in the remixed version. Of course some of the most challenging remixes can question this generalization. But based on its history, it can be stated that there are three types of remixes. The first remix is extended, that is a longer version of the original song containing long instrumental sections making it more mixable for the club DJ. The first known disco song to be extended to ten minutes is “Ten Percent,” by Double Exposure, remixed by Walter Gibbons in 1976.[1]


Image source: Vinyl Masterpiece

The second remix is selective; it consists of adding or subtracting material from the original song. This is the type of remix which made DJs popular producers in the music mainstream. One of the most successful selective remixes is Eric B. & Rakim’s “Paid in Full,” remixed by Coldcut in 1987. [2] In this case Coldcut produced two remixes, the most popular version not only extended the original recording, following the tradition of the club mix (like Gibbons), but it also contained new sections as well as new sounds, while others were subtracted, always keeping the “essence” of the song intact.

Image source: Rate Your Music

The third remix is reflexive; it allegorizes and extends the aesthetic of sampling, where the remixed version challenges the aura of the original and claims autonomy even when it carries the name of the original; material is added or deleted, but the original tracks are largely left intact to be recognizable. An example of this is Mad Professor’s famous dub/trip hop album No Protection, which is a remix of Massive Attack’s Protection. In this case both albums, the original and the remixed versions, are considered works on their own, yet the remixed version is completely dependent on Massive’s original production for validation.[3] The fact that both albums were released at the same time in 1994 further complicates Mad Professor’s allegory. This complexity lies in the fact that Mad Professor’s production is part of the tradition of Jamaica’s dub, where the term “version” was often used to refer to “remixes” which due to their extensive manipulation in the studio pushed for allegorical autonomy.[4]

Image source: Last FM

Allegory is often deconstructed in more advanced remixes following this third form, and quickly moves to be a reflexive exercise that at times leads to a “remix” in which the only thing that is recognizable from the original is the title. But, to be clear—no matter what—the remix will always rely on the authority of the original song. When this activity is extended to culture at large, the remix is in the end a re-mix—that is a rearrangement of something already recognizable; it functions at a second level: a meta-level. This implies that the originality of the remix is non-existent, therefore it must acknowledge its source of validation self-reflexively. In brief, the remix when extended as a cultural practice is a second mix of something pre-existent; the material that is mixed at least for a second time must be recognized otherwise it could be misunderstood as something new, and it would become plagiarism. Without a history, the remix cannot be Remix.[5]

The extended, selective and reflexive remixes can quickly crossover and blur their own definitions. Based on a materialist historical analysis, it can be noted that DJs became invested in remixes which inherited a rich practice of appropriation that had been at play in culture at large for many decades. Below are brief definitions with visual examples.

REMIXES

Extended Remixes
The Extended Remix was an early form of remix in which DJs from New York City became invested. On close examination this was a reaction against the status quo, where everything was made as brief as possible, from radio songs to novels. I argue that due to this, the extended remix is not found in mass culture prior to this period.

The Disco DJs, going against the grain, actually extended music compositions to make them more danceable. They took 3 to 4 minute compositions that would be friendly to radio play, and extended them as long as 10 minutes.[6] In the seventies this was quite radical because in fact, it is the summary of long material that is constantly privileged in the mainstream—which is true even today. The reason behind this tendency has to do in part with the efficiency that popular culture demands. That is, everything is optimized to be quickly delivered and consumed by as many people as possible. An obvious example of this tendency from history is the popularity of publications like Reader’s Digest, which offers condensed versions of books as well as stories for people who want to be informed but do not have the time to read the original material, which is often more extensive. [7]

Image source: E Bay

Another recent activity that is now emerging on the web is the two-minute “replay” available for TV shows like “Studio 60 on the Sunset Strip.”[8] If you missed the show when it aired, you can spend just two minutes online catching up on the plot; in essence, this is a more efficient version of Reader’s Digest for TV delivered to your Internet doorstep. This two-minute replay is also called “video highlights.” At the same time, this optimization of information allows entire programs to be uploaded by average consumers in short segments to community websites like Youtube, which in the end function as promotion for TV media.[9]

Image source: Youtube

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Filed under: art, design, fashion, hack, new media, opensource, research, social, space/place, technology

Embodiment in Digital Art

( via artificial.dk )

A little background via their site >>

Welcome to artificial.dk – your news resource for information about net art, software art, and other computer based art forms. Our mission is to promote these art forms to a broad audience because we believe they can develop and nuance our views on advanced technologies and the society they are a part of.

Artificial.dk is now an archive of articles and activities from the period 2001-2007. No new articles will be added, but you are welcome to browse through our previously published articles. Your hosts and editors were Kristine Ploug & Thomas Petersen. Contact us at: artificial at artificial dot dk.

Special: Embodiment in Digital Art

Dan Graham: Body Press, 1970-1972. Photo: Dan Graham, courtesy of the artist and Marian Goodman Gallery , New York and Paris.


‘[…] the image can no longer be restricted to the level of surface appearance, but must be extended to encompass the entire process by which information is made perceivable through embodied existence. This is what I propose to call the digital image.’ (Mark Hansen: New Philosophy for New Media, p. 10)

In this last special at Artificial we have chosen the theme: ‘Embodiment in digital art’. Inspired by current trends in media art and theory, we take our point of departure in the expanded notion of the digital image in order to have a closer look at the role of the body in contemporary digital art and culture.

Art has always actively involved human beings: whether you read a book, watch a film, visit a museum – or just talk to a good friend. As soon as you engage in the world, a process of interaction and exchange occurs.

In his widely acknowledged book, New Philosophy for New Media, Mark Hansen demonstrates how the embodied spectator is involved directly in the very production of contemporary media art with focus on process, performance and interaction. The ‘image’ can no longer be understood as an external formal thing, e.g. as a canvas hanging on the wall in a gallery. The so-called digital image has to be acknowledged as an open field or terrain of possibilities in-formed or in-framed by physically present human beings in specific situations bound in time and space. The embodied existence is the filter, the nexus and the materiality of the art experience. Following Mark Hansen’s argument means that in order to grasp the new scene for the digital art event, we have to turn our focus from the level of code towards the embodied human experience.


Left: still image from Myron Kruegers Videoplace, 1970. Info and video: www.artmuseum.net/w2vr/timeline/Krueger.html. Right: Nam June Paik: Random Access, 1963. Photo: Manfred Montwé. www.nydigitalsalon.org/10/artwork.php?artwork=13.

This special consists of a number of interviews and articles about international projects – from young talented ideas to prominent research projects – which investigate aspects of embodiment in different art forms supported by state of the art technology. Our focus on this subject is part of a wider theme on ‘body and technology’ which will be launched by the web magazine Turbulens (www.turbulens.net) in March 2007 (the curator group Maskinstorm (www.maskinstorm.org) is also involved in the theme). Keep an eye open this spring for a broad variety of activities within the field.

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Filed under: applications, architecture, art, consciousness, DIY, hack, locative, mobility, new media, research, social, space/place, technology, urban

Pulp covers turned into 3D sculptures

( via boingboing )

Minnesota photographer Thomas Allen cuts illustrations from the covers and interior pages of pulp novels and kids’ books, turns them into 3D scenes and photographs them.

 

As a director would stage actors, Allen stages his cut-outs in ways that create humor, tension, mystery, and drama. A boxer fights his own shadow in Spar, and in Bookend a gunfighter stands over his recently fallen opponent. Although the characters are freed from the closed pages of books, the books themselves still remain present in each photograph. A ship sails across the curved pages of a dictionary-sized book in Swell. In Cover, a gunman finds safety behind the spine of a book. And in Recover, a worn paperback acts as a life raft to three weathered shipwreck survivors.

Link (via IZ Reloaded)

Filed under: art, hack

Take digital photos through a microscope

( via hackzine )

microphoto_20070513.jpg
There’s a way to take photos through a microscope, telescope, or binoculars with a regular digital camera and no special lense adapter. The trick is to use the macro mode on your camera. With a bit of positioning and focus tweaking, you should be able to get a clear photo. If you use a tripod with your camera, you can set it up once and continue taking additional shots –

Link.

Filed under: DIY, hack, technology

Sex Hacks: Artists, Technologists, Designers, & Geeks

( via laughing squid )

Sex Hacks takes place this Monday, May 21st at the Center for Sex and Culture in San Francisco. Produced and moderated by sex blogger Melissa Gira, the event features NYC artist Norene Leddy presenting “The Aphrodite Project”, sex geek qDot on Sex Toy Hacks, dominatrix Natasha Strange demonstrating Hypnotic Electronic Mind Hacks and art prankster Johannes Grenzfurthner of monochrom (who is in town for Maker Faire) talking about the sex & technology conference Arse Elektronika 2007 which takes place October 5-7 in San Francisco.

____

A little background on The Center for Sex and Culture :

WHAT IS THE CENTER FOR SEX & CULTURE?  

OUR MISSION STATEMENT: Our mission is to provide non-judgmental, sex-positive sexuality education and support to diverse populations by means of classes, workshops, social gatherings, cultural events, and practical skills-building events; to maintain and house these events and supporting materials and functions; to maintain a publicly-accessible library and archives; to staff and support this learning environment.

More info.> 

Filed under: art, DIY, fashion, hack, new media, research, social, technology

John Maushammer’s Amazing Pong Watch

( via laughing squid )

Yesterday at Maker Day, Make Magazine writer/blogger and Maker Faire co-organizer Phillip Torrone introduced me to John Maushammer who showed me the really cool Pong Watch that he has created. John has been documenting his design and manufacturing process on his Pong Watch blog and he has made a great video showing the watch in action and how he created it.

I succeeded in compressing all the electronics for this watch in to a 10mm-thick case. The 96×64 OLED display runs continuously – unlike older LED watches, there is no need to press a button to see the time. Battery life is 25 hours, so recharging is done every night.

Here’s previous coverage of the Pong Watch from Make and Boing Boing.

John does not currently have any plans to produce and sell the watch, but who knows, maybe one day…

photo credit: Scott Beale

Filed under: art, DIY, hack, new media, opensource, technology

OFFF Day 3

A little background on Offf (through their web-site)>

Since 2001, OFFF is exploring software aesthetics and new languages for interactive and visual expression.

Every year, the festival features digital artists, web and print designers, motion graphic studios and avant-garde electronic musicians. But OFFF is more than an event about any of these disciplines. More than a design conference, a multimedia trade fair, or a digital animation festival. OFFF is an enthusiastic celebration of a new visual culture.

OFFF is spreading the work of a generation of creators that are breaking all kind of limits. Those separating the commercial arena from the worlds of art and design; music from illustration, or ink and chalk from pixels. Artists that have grown with the web and receive inspiration from digital tools, even when their canvas is not the screen.

From exercises in interactive synesthesia that excite all our senses to stage performances made of lines of computer code. All this, and much more, is shown every year at OFFF; one of the essential meeting points for the international scene of postdigital creation.

Past participants in OFFF include legends of graphic design and visual communication like Neville Brody, Tomato, Kyle Cooper or Stefan Sagmeister; acknowledged software artistssuch as Jared Tarbell, Lia, Casey Reas y Ben Fry, or Daniel Brown; innovators of the moving image like We work for Them, Tronic Studio, D-Fuse or Renascent; explorers of advanced interaction like Soda, James Paterson, Amit Pitaru or Craig Swann; and the most important names that have defined the aesthetics of the experimental and creative side of the Web: Joshua Davis, Yugo Nakamura, Hi-Res!, Josh Ulm, or Erik Natzke. The festival has also a special spot for the main names in the Spanish scene (Area3, Vasava, Innothna, Cocoe, Dani Granatta, La Mosca…) and for creators of surprising new kinds of sonic landscapes: Tujiko Noriko, The Vegetable Orchestra, Sutekh, Taylor Deupree, System, Daedelus, Stephan Mathieu, Kenneth Kirschner

________________________

Coverage by, (who else ?!) Regine

On the last day at OFFF in Barcelona, Matt Pyke gave a little walk-through of his work at the Designers Republic and especially all the things he has been setting up (from a lovely garden in Sheffield) with his multidisciplinary studio Universal Everything since he has left there.

offf3_1.jpg

Especially nice were the 20.000 generated characters for the Lovebytes festival which instantly became the subject of collecting and their installations for the Nokia store in NYC. On its screens you see people which are basically flocks of pixels which interchange parts of each other when calling – creating a simple yet poetic visualization of the company’s “connecting people”-mantra. They also have a blog called Everyone Forever on which Universal Everything collect stuff that inspires them.

Later that day, it was John Maeda’s turn which put me in a similar position to Régine when Bruce Sterling was talking at IFID since it was more of an eclectic lecture to inspire his numerous audience which is naturally difficult to write up. We’ll try anyway:

Actually, John Maeda never wanted to talk about his work in front of audiences like this again ever since an illustrator told him that his computer-based work “is so empty”. It’s much better to talk about ideas anyway. One of his latest ideas was Simplicity but he’s already getting tired of that by now. When he got really tired, he went on a vacation at Cape Cod, Massachusetts. He needed to get khaki shorts, so he went to a GAP store and there was even more simplicity (“Keep it simple”), switch on the TV and you see Paris Hilton living “The Simple Life” and the list goes on. But maybe we just love complexity too much to make everything simple. Take the MIT media lab, a place which, thanks to I.M. Pei‘s architecture, looks very simple from the outside. Yet, it’s a very complex place. While at Google, you get free smoothies (and accumulate the dreaded Google 15), in academia there’s no such thing. Instead they give people titles, lots of them, making their lives ever more complex with growing responsibilities. As he also describes in his book Maeda@Media, John grew up in a family-run tofu factory in Seattle. Tofu also is simple food, but the edamame beans it is made of need to go through a complex process to become the final product. This was a very spartan education and made him thoroughly enjoy studying at school. When it was time to choose a college, he went for MIT’s media lab, which, from above, coincidentally also resembles a chunk of tofu. He met Muriel Cooper who told him to go to art school which is what he did and where he met more mentors like Paul Rand and Ikko Tanaka who were all very advanced in their careers and focussed more on humanizing their students than anything else.


John Maeda (sort of) and his Apple II

Early in John’s own professional career, Japanese cosmetics-company Shiseido had him working “like Batman, teaching by day, arting by night”. Yet, many would consider his work to be “eye candy”, a term which he would like to see replaced with “eye meat” since it tries to get to the core of the question about how to create with computers. Back in those days, Maeda got an Apple 2-computer for $1500 and it did nothing. In 1995 in Kyoto, he built the “Human Powered Computer” which replaced all the mysterious inner workings of the machine with people. Quite funny and it lead him to better understand the spirituality of the machine. Many said that “the computer is nothing more that a pencil”, a statement which made many designers and artists feel comfortable with great changes already on the horizon. It is indeed a great tool, but we’re still trying to find out what kind of tool it really is. Every today’s software works a bit like a tree with alternatives branching out everywhere. Problem is, when you try to make art you always get stuck on that tree. And: paradoxically, true art will always be off that tree entirely.

Read full article here >

Coverage by Regine >

Filed under: architecture, art, DIY, films, graphics, hack, locative, mobility, new media, physical computing, research, social, space/place, technology, urban

HACKING-Couture

Latest shoot:

 

OPEN SOURCE FASHION: fashion for the masses by the masses


Hacking Couture focuses on the documentation of established fashion identities in order to create a shared library that allows democratic access to its findings and contributions. The open source movement took its peak during the 1990’s and ever since, the software revolution has allowed for the exploration resulting on endless advancement in diverse fields, giving an improvement of the industry.

This advancement has been the result of opening the dialogue among computer programmers and by allowing public access and contribution, by the sharing of existing computer code and allowing its use for other applications. In addition to the sharing aspect, documention of these computer code is an importnat part of the open source cullture. More recently, the open source movement has been applied to hardware [physical aspect of computers, the circuit and all the other physical components that make a computer*]. People have started to document how they hack into electronic devices [brake into a system and modify it in order for it to execute the desired task].

Hacking Couture’s ongoing research and documentation focuses on the documentation of the design code of established identities in order to derive new and evolving fashion aesthetics, serving also as a platform for
self-expression and nest for new ideas.


*When we refer to computers, we refer to any device that incorporates a micro-controller of chip. Some examples these devices are mp3 players, microwaves, printers, etc.

Once the code has been documented Hacking Couture publishes an example of a design hack based on the identity studied, in order to share and enhance the fashion dialogue between remote users, and participants of the Hacking Couture workshops.

 

Filed under: art, DIY, fashion, hack, new media, opensource, research, social

Maker faire: SWAP-O-RAMA-RAMA

via makezine

Wendy and Heather have all the details for the next SWAP-O-RAMA-RAMA @ Maker Faire!

The Spring Season Bay Area SWAP-O-RAMA-RAMA is Here! http://www.swaporamarama.org Pass it onMay 19th 11-5 & May 20th 11 to 4
Re-Use Fashion Show Sat. May 19th 5pm
@ Maker Faire
http://www.makerfaire.com
Located at the San Mateo Fairgrounds

A ticket to Maker Faire plus any size bag of your unwanted clothes required to enter, leave with all the clothes you can carry plus learn to modify and make new from old. Get Advance Tix and Save $ – Link.

“There is no beauty in the finest cloth if it makes hunger and unhappiness.” Gandhi

Join in the communal process of reuse and celebrate our collective creativity! You are invited to Swap-O-Rama-Rama, a giant clothing swap and series of do-it-yourself workshops in which a community explores reuse and creativity through the recycling of used clothing. And while your there explore the massive creativity of Maker Faire celebrating art, engineering, science and the spirit of DIY.

It’s easy to make the move from consumer to creator – and it’s fun. At this Swap-O-Rama-Rama you’ll find a host of talent brought together to teach you how to transform your new/used duds into works of your own.

Check out the extraordinary crew of artists and designers & the workshops being offered – Link.

Together they bring you: DIY Stations where you can learn many wonderful ways to create out of textile reuse, Sewing Stations where local designers will teach you fresh clothing mod tricks, on site Silk Screeners & Stencilers with a host of original designs and extraordinary local designers who’ll show off their work in the Swap-O-Rama-Rama reuse fashion show MC’d by Sig Hafstrom.

Of course the core of the swap is the gigantic piles of free clothing (several thousand pounds!) sorted into categories: pants, shirts, skirts, sweaters etc. These piles are the collective total of each guest’s contribution of any size bag of unwanted clothes so clean out those closets and let go of what’s no longer inspiring. Take home as much clothing as you can carry. Remainders go to a local women’s shelter.

Wondering what to bring? – Link.
Sewing machines are generously supplied by Janome – Link.

Tell your friends to join the swap mailing list by sending a blank email to ncali-subscribe@gaiatreehouse.com

See you there…

Wendy Tremayne and Heather Cameron

Filed under: DIY, films, hack