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Hack Your Brain – Make Video Podcast

( via makezine )


This weekend, learn how to hack your brain by making Mitch Altman’s Brain Machine! It flashes LEDs into your eyes and beeps sounds into your ears to make your brain waves sync up into beta, alpha, theta, and delta brainwaves!

Mitch invents cool things that make the world a better place. He’s well known for the TV-B-GONE and this brain machine is his latest project. One of the cool things about this project, is that it builds on an open source project. Mitch used Lady Ada‘s open source MiniPOV and switched out LEDs and added new capacitors and resistors and then rewrote the firmware to make it into the brain machine. It’s super cool when people make hardware open source so that others can work with it!

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Make sure to take pictures of your build and of you in your brain machine and upload them to the Make: flickr pool.

Weekend Projects is sponsored by microchip.com. Check out their seminars and 16 bit contest.

Get the podcast and pdf downloaded automatically in itunes. – Link

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Filed under: design, DIY, hack, space/place, technology

The Spiderweb Skirt by Josi Hannon Madera

( via craftzine )

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This week’s CRAFT Pattern Podcast is extra special for the long Memorial Day weekend. The Spiderweb Skirt is a crochet skirt by Josi Hannon Madera of Art of Crochet. It’s the perfect skirt to make for the upcoming summer. Recommended yarns are: Knit Picks Shine Worsted, Elann Callista, and Berroco Love It. If you need crochet help, the Art of Crochet has plenty of video stitch guides to help you along the way. You can also catch up with Josi on the Art of Crochet Blog.

  • Download this week’s CRAFT pattern PDF – Link.

Subscribe to the CRAFT podcast and get this pattern and other CRAFT content delivered automatically via iTunes – Link

Filed under: art, DIY, fashion

COOL MEDIA HOT TALK SHOW

( via networked_performance )

Cool media hot talk show : D.I.Y. talk show on art & media ::

TOPIC: New Media Art Mythologies ::

SPEAKERS: Geert Lovink and Armin Medosch :: QUESTIONS: ask-it-yourself now and during the show here :: June 5, 20.30 CET :: Video stream and interface for online participation :: Location: De Balie, Amsterdam (bring your laptops and mobiles)

New Media Art Mythologies…to be questioned… :: Recent discussions about (new) media art concerned a wide range of issues: starting from the validity of the term itself and ending with questioning the very premises of the modes of distinction through which the (new) media art field constitutes itself as a form of art, cultural practice, social context, institutional domain, and discourse. The feeling of a certain Rubicon, provoking self-introspective reflections, was expressed by many.

The coming edition of Cool Media Hot Talk Show on the topic “New Media Art Mythologies” will welcome persistent critical voices of the media art scene – Geert Lovink and Armin Medosch. They will present their judgements and arguments regarding the current critical stage in the development of new media art. The debates will address socio-cultural position of new media art in a historical perspective, which both speakers are discussing extensively in their writings. Preliminary suggested focal points are:

– The marginalised position of new media art within the broader cultural context.
– New media art vis-`-vis changing trends of cultural policies.
– Discursive troubles: in search for mediatory theories and media art criticism.
– New media between aesthetics and politics.

Continue reading >

Filed under: art, design, DIY, films, new media, social, space/place, technology

MINI DIY DESIGNER BATTERY LAMPS – Designer Emulator Kit

( via inhabitat )

Mini Designer DIY Battery Lights, DEK Emulator Lights, Designer Battery Lights, Mark McKenna, DEK lights, 9-volt battery lights, mini designer lights, Emulator lights, ICFF 2007

One of our favorite finds from this year’s ICFF is Mark McKenna’s collection of pocket-size do-It-yourself designer battery lights. We’ve seen 9-volt batteries acting as light sources before, as in Richard Lawson’s DIY LED light, but these ‘DEK’ (Designer Emulation Kits) bring iconic design to another (albeit small-scale) level. The kits consist of a series of flat pieces that you remove from the printed circuit board, assemble, and hook up to a 9-volt battery. They come in five models, all representations of some of the most famous designer lamps (Ingo Maurer’s Lucellino, Castiglioni’s Arco and Toio, Sapper’s Tizio, and Philippe Starck’s Miss K). We love the high-design-meets-DIY aspect of these mini-lamps, and at $26 each, they won’t break the bank.

Mini Designer DIY Battery Lights, DEK Emulator Lights, Designer Battery Lights, Mark McKenna, DEK lights, 9-volt battery lights, mini designer lights, Emulator lights, ICFF 2007

More images here >

Filed under: design, DIY, technology

Otto around the world

( via notcot )

He is Otto, a free paper toy… print it, cut it, paste it and take him for a trip. The objective is that Otto goes around the world.

Filed under: art, DIY, space/place

Maker Faire Photos

( via makezine )

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Hi Makers! Thanks to everyone who came out to the Maker Faire and helped make it a success! We had so much fun meeting everyone. We’ll have plenty of recaps for you on the MAKE blog once we get all our photos up and have sufficiently recovered from our aching feet. If you missed it, we’ll be doing another Maker Faire this October 20-21 in Austin so we hope to meet you there!

Check out our blogger team photos here:

  • Phil’s Photos – Link.
  • Bre’s Photos – Link.
  • Brian’s Photos – Link.
  • Nat’s CRAFT Photos – Link.

All photos tagged makerfaire and makerfairebayarea2007.

Filed under: DIY, festival, space/place, technology

Free downloadable card by Joan m.k. tycko

( via cribcandy )

Here you can download PDF files that will allow you to print out some choice illustrations from The Accidental Mind in notecard format. Print, fold and enjoy!

Illustrations by Joan M.K. Tycko.

Filed under: art, DIY, graphics

Open Design Club

( link via notcot )


A brief intro. via their website :

“Open Design Club”
We like to think of ourselves as a virtual design studio, which also offers the opportunity to present and share ideas and open source design products. Everybody can become a collaborator of the the Open Design Club by contributing designs and ideas or by producing and selling the products presented by the Open Design Club.

“Join the Club”
We want to inspire you to become active and creative. We offer instructions for design products you can download and produce at home. The products of the Open Design Club are licensed under a creative commons license which means, that you can copy, sample, modify and even sell them if you want. We believe that removing copyrights from our designs will inspire creativity and result in multiple new designs. We share our ideas, our know how and we hope, that you’ll contribute, too.

“Share your Products”

_Some of their products:

.: Delight Lamp :.

Active Image

This lamp is made out of sandbags which are normaly used for emergency flood control. If you want to make a lamp by yourself just download the instruction pdf.

Download: delight_lamp.pdf

by:

Johannes Heinzmann
joh[dot]hei[at]web[dot]de

http://www.opendesignclub.com

 

.: Neon Floor Lamp :.

image of a floor lamp made out of cheap neon lights

This super bright neon floor lamp is made out of three cheap standard neon lights you can buy in any do-it-yourself store.

To learn how to make this lamp you can download a pdf instruction.

Download: neon_floor_lamp.pdf

by:

Johannes Heinzmann
joh[dot]hei[at]web[dot]de

Find out more at :-
open design club

Filed under: applications, architecture, art, DIY, new media, research, social, space/place, technology

Embodiment in Digital Art

( via artificial.dk )

A little background via their site >>

Welcome to artificial.dk – your news resource for information about net art, software art, and other computer based art forms. Our mission is to promote these art forms to a broad audience because we believe they can develop and nuance our views on advanced technologies and the society they are a part of.

Artificial.dk is now an archive of articles and activities from the period 2001-2007. No new articles will be added, but you are welcome to browse through our previously published articles. Your hosts and editors were Kristine Ploug & Thomas Petersen. Contact us at: artificial at artificial dot dk.

Special: Embodiment in Digital Art

Dan Graham: Body Press, 1970-1972. Photo: Dan Graham, courtesy of the artist and Marian Goodman Gallery , New York and Paris.


‘[…] the image can no longer be restricted to the level of surface appearance, but must be extended to encompass the entire process by which information is made perceivable through embodied existence. This is what I propose to call the digital image.’ (Mark Hansen: New Philosophy for New Media, p. 10)

In this last special at Artificial we have chosen the theme: ‘Embodiment in digital art’. Inspired by current trends in media art and theory, we take our point of departure in the expanded notion of the digital image in order to have a closer look at the role of the body in contemporary digital art and culture.

Art has always actively involved human beings: whether you read a book, watch a film, visit a museum – or just talk to a good friend. As soon as you engage in the world, a process of interaction and exchange occurs.

In his widely acknowledged book, New Philosophy for New Media, Mark Hansen demonstrates how the embodied spectator is involved directly in the very production of contemporary media art with focus on process, performance and interaction. The ‘image’ can no longer be understood as an external formal thing, e.g. as a canvas hanging on the wall in a gallery. The so-called digital image has to be acknowledged as an open field or terrain of possibilities in-formed or in-framed by physically present human beings in specific situations bound in time and space. The embodied existence is the filter, the nexus and the materiality of the art experience. Following Mark Hansen’s argument means that in order to grasp the new scene for the digital art event, we have to turn our focus from the level of code towards the embodied human experience.


Left: still image from Myron Kruegers Videoplace, 1970. Info and video: www.artmuseum.net/w2vr/timeline/Krueger.html. Right: Nam June Paik: Random Access, 1963. Photo: Manfred Montwé. www.nydigitalsalon.org/10/artwork.php?artwork=13.

This special consists of a number of interviews and articles about international projects – from young talented ideas to prominent research projects – which investigate aspects of embodiment in different art forms supported by state of the art technology. Our focus on this subject is part of a wider theme on ‘body and technology’ which will be launched by the web magazine Turbulens (www.turbulens.net) in March 2007 (the curator group Maskinstorm (www.maskinstorm.org) is also involved in the theme). Keep an eye open this spring for a broad variety of activities within the field.

Continue reading >

Filed under: applications, architecture, art, consciousness, DIY, hack, locative, mobility, new media, research, social, space/place, technology, urban

Take digital photos through a microscope

( via hackzine )

microphoto_20070513.jpg
There’s a way to take photos through a microscope, telescope, or binoculars with a regular digital camera and no special lense adapter. The trick is to use the macro mode on your camera. With a bit of positioning and focus tweaking, you should be able to get a clear photo. If you use a tripod with your camera, you can set it up once and continue taking additional shots –

Link.

Filed under: DIY, hack, technology

Sex Hacks: Artists, Technologists, Designers, & Geeks

( via laughing squid )

Sex Hacks takes place this Monday, May 21st at the Center for Sex and Culture in San Francisco. Produced and moderated by sex blogger Melissa Gira, the event features NYC artist Norene Leddy presenting “The Aphrodite Project”, sex geek qDot on Sex Toy Hacks, dominatrix Natasha Strange demonstrating Hypnotic Electronic Mind Hacks and art prankster Johannes Grenzfurthner of monochrom (who is in town for Maker Faire) talking about the sex & technology conference Arse Elektronika 2007 which takes place October 5-7 in San Francisco.

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A little background on The Center for Sex and Culture :

WHAT IS THE CENTER FOR SEX & CULTURE?  

OUR MISSION STATEMENT: Our mission is to provide non-judgmental, sex-positive sexuality education and support to diverse populations by means of classes, workshops, social gatherings, cultural events, and practical skills-building events; to maintain and house these events and supporting materials and functions; to maintain a publicly-accessible library and archives; to staff and support this learning environment.

More info.> 

Filed under: art, DIY, fashion, hack, new media, research, social, technology

John Maushammer’s Amazing Pong Watch

( via laughing squid )

Yesterday at Maker Day, Make Magazine writer/blogger and Maker Faire co-organizer Phillip Torrone introduced me to John Maushammer who showed me the really cool Pong Watch that he has created. John has been documenting his design and manufacturing process on his Pong Watch blog and he has made a great video showing the watch in action and how he created it.

I succeeded in compressing all the electronics for this watch in to a 10mm-thick case. The 96×64 OLED display runs continuously – unlike older LED watches, there is no need to press a button to see the time. Battery life is 25 hours, so recharging is done every night.

Here’s previous coverage of the Pong Watch from Make and Boing Boing.

John does not currently have any plans to produce and sell the watch, but who knows, maybe one day…

photo credit: Scott Beale

Filed under: art, DIY, hack, new media, opensource, technology

Mr. Smeary

( via notcot )

Free Papertoy by illuntic.de:

Mr. Smeary – your worst nightmare at work!
Print him, build him, hate him!

Filed under: art, DIY

Mashing / Mapping

( via plugimi )

.: Pdf :.
A little info. on the workshop ( via mediamatic ):

In this new workshop participants will develop prototypes for hybrid world media applications. While the internet is still thought of as a virtual space, it is quickly gaining foot in the physical world.

An Internet-of-Things is under construction, with RFID as a key technology. Unique digital identification and GPS tracking devices link digital media to places and objects. Mobile phones and urban screens allow the media to be everywhere people are.

This workshop explores the role of media makers (content creators) in the context of the increasingly intimate fusion of digital and physical space.

The Day of the Figurines – Locarno – Show by BlastTheory

Reader for Hybrid World Lab >

.: A collection of projects, theory and criticism on Hybrid World developments and RFID :.

Filed under: applications, art, DIY, locative, mobility, new media, research, situationist, space/place, technology

OFFF Day 3

A little background on Offf (through their web-site)>

Since 2001, OFFF is exploring software aesthetics and new languages for interactive and visual expression.

Every year, the festival features digital artists, web and print designers, motion graphic studios and avant-garde electronic musicians. But OFFF is more than an event about any of these disciplines. More than a design conference, a multimedia trade fair, or a digital animation festival. OFFF is an enthusiastic celebration of a new visual culture.

OFFF is spreading the work of a generation of creators that are breaking all kind of limits. Those separating the commercial arena from the worlds of art and design; music from illustration, or ink and chalk from pixels. Artists that have grown with the web and receive inspiration from digital tools, even when their canvas is not the screen.

From exercises in interactive synesthesia that excite all our senses to stage performances made of lines of computer code. All this, and much more, is shown every year at OFFF; one of the essential meeting points for the international scene of postdigital creation.

Past participants in OFFF include legends of graphic design and visual communication like Neville Brody, Tomato, Kyle Cooper or Stefan Sagmeister; acknowledged software artistssuch as Jared Tarbell, Lia, Casey Reas y Ben Fry, or Daniel Brown; innovators of the moving image like We work for Them, Tronic Studio, D-Fuse or Renascent; explorers of advanced interaction like Soda, James Paterson, Amit Pitaru or Craig Swann; and the most important names that have defined the aesthetics of the experimental and creative side of the Web: Joshua Davis, Yugo Nakamura, Hi-Res!, Josh Ulm, or Erik Natzke. The festival has also a special spot for the main names in the Spanish scene (Area3, Vasava, Innothna, Cocoe, Dani Granatta, La Mosca…) and for creators of surprising new kinds of sonic landscapes: Tujiko Noriko, The Vegetable Orchestra, Sutekh, Taylor Deupree, System, Daedelus, Stephan Mathieu, Kenneth Kirschner

________________________

Coverage by, (who else ?!) Regine

On the last day at OFFF in Barcelona, Matt Pyke gave a little walk-through of his work at the Designers Republic and especially all the things he has been setting up (from a lovely garden in Sheffield) with his multidisciplinary studio Universal Everything since he has left there.

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Especially nice were the 20.000 generated characters for the Lovebytes festival which instantly became the subject of collecting and their installations for the Nokia store in NYC. On its screens you see people which are basically flocks of pixels which interchange parts of each other when calling – creating a simple yet poetic visualization of the company’s “connecting people”-mantra. They also have a blog called Everyone Forever on which Universal Everything collect stuff that inspires them.

Later that day, it was John Maeda’s turn which put me in a similar position to Régine when Bruce Sterling was talking at IFID since it was more of an eclectic lecture to inspire his numerous audience which is naturally difficult to write up. We’ll try anyway:

Actually, John Maeda never wanted to talk about his work in front of audiences like this again ever since an illustrator told him that his computer-based work “is so empty”. It’s much better to talk about ideas anyway. One of his latest ideas was Simplicity but he’s already getting tired of that by now. When he got really tired, he went on a vacation at Cape Cod, Massachusetts. He needed to get khaki shorts, so he went to a GAP store and there was even more simplicity (“Keep it simple”), switch on the TV and you see Paris Hilton living “The Simple Life” and the list goes on. But maybe we just love complexity too much to make everything simple. Take the MIT media lab, a place which, thanks to I.M. Pei‘s architecture, looks very simple from the outside. Yet, it’s a very complex place. While at Google, you get free smoothies (and accumulate the dreaded Google 15), in academia there’s no such thing. Instead they give people titles, lots of them, making their lives ever more complex with growing responsibilities. As he also describes in his book Maeda@Media, John grew up in a family-run tofu factory in Seattle. Tofu also is simple food, but the edamame beans it is made of need to go through a complex process to become the final product. This was a very spartan education and made him thoroughly enjoy studying at school. When it was time to choose a college, he went for MIT’s media lab, which, from above, coincidentally also resembles a chunk of tofu. He met Muriel Cooper who told him to go to art school which is what he did and where he met more mentors like Paul Rand and Ikko Tanaka who were all very advanced in their careers and focussed more on humanizing their students than anything else.


John Maeda (sort of) and his Apple II

Early in John’s own professional career, Japanese cosmetics-company Shiseido had him working “like Batman, teaching by day, arting by night”. Yet, many would consider his work to be “eye candy”, a term which he would like to see replaced with “eye meat” since it tries to get to the core of the question about how to create with computers. Back in those days, Maeda got an Apple 2-computer for $1500 and it did nothing. In 1995 in Kyoto, he built the “Human Powered Computer” which replaced all the mysterious inner workings of the machine with people. Quite funny and it lead him to better understand the spirituality of the machine. Many said that “the computer is nothing more that a pencil”, a statement which made many designers and artists feel comfortable with great changes already on the horizon. It is indeed a great tool, but we’re still trying to find out what kind of tool it really is. Every today’s software works a bit like a tree with alternatives branching out everywhere. Problem is, when you try to make art you always get stuck on that tree. And: paradoxically, true art will always be off that tree entirely.

Read full article here >

Coverage by Regine >

Filed under: architecture, art, DIY, films, graphics, hack, locative, mobility, new media, physical computing, research, social, space/place, technology, urban